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Oral Care – A World Without Cavities!

The oral health is often neglected with our desire to savour most bizarre food options on the plate.

Learning how to protect the teeth from such harmful germ buildup can help the teeth stay and healthy in the long run. The health of your mouth, teeth and gums can affect your general health. Let us understand how can we avoid early damages and avoid as many diseases as possible.

 

The Connection – Oral and Overall Health!

Did you know that your oral health offers clues about your overall health — or that problems in your mouth can affect the rest of your body?

Protect yourself by learning more about the connection between your oral health and overall health.

Like other areas of the body, your mouth teems with bacteria — mostly harmless. But your mouth is the entry point to your digestive and respiratory tracts, and some of these bacteria can cause disease.

Tip: Normally the body’s natural defences and good oral health care, such as daily brushing and flossing, keep bacteria under control.

However, without proper oral hygiene, bacteria can reach levels that might lead to oral infections, such as tooth decay and gum disease.

 

Medications can cause tooth decay:

Medications — such as decongestants, antihistamines, painkillers, diuretics and antidepressants — can reduce saliva flow. Dehydration can cause the most natural lubricant, saliva reduction.

Saliva, washes away food and neutralizes acids produced by bacteria in the mouth, helping to protect from microbes that multiply and lead to disease.

Study and Research suggest that oral bacteria and the inflammation associated with a severe form of gum disease (periodontitis) might play a major role in some diseases.

Note: And certain diseases, such as diabetes and HIV/AIDS, can lower the body’s resistance to infection, making oral health problems more severe.

 

Problems associated with oral health!

The oral health might contribute to various diseases and conditions, including, if not taken care properly:

Endocarditis. This infection of the inner lining of your heart chambers or valves (endocardium) typically occurs when bacteria or other germs from another part of your body, such as your mouth, spread through your bloodstream and attach to certain areas in your heart.

Cardiovascular disease. Although the connection is not fully understood, some research suggests that heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke might be linked to the inflammation and infections that oral bacteria can cause.

Pregnancy and birth complications. Periodontitis has been linked to premature birth and low birth weight.

Pneumonia. Certain bacteria in your mouth can be pulled into your lungs, causing pneumonia and other respiratory diseases.

 

Critical Diseases Affecting Oral Health:

Diabetes. By reducing the body’s resistance to infection, diabetes puts the healthy gums at risk. It is found frequently with people who suffer from gum disease. The odds of this is it can turn out severe too.

Research shows that people who have gum disease have a harder time controlling their blood sugar levels. Regular periodontal care can improve diabetes control.

HIV/AIDS. Oral problems, such as painful mucosal lesions, are common in people who have HIV/AIDS.

Osteoporosis. This bone-weakening disease is linked with periodontal bone loss and tooth loss. Certain drugs used to treat osteoporosis carry a small risk of damage to the bones of the jaw.

Alzheimer’s disease. Worsening oral health is seen as Alzheimer’s disease progresses.

Other conditions that might be linked to oral health include eating disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, certain cancers and an immune system disorder that causes dry mouth (Sjogren’s syndrome).

Tell your dentist about the medications you take and about changes in your overall health, especially if you’ve recently been ill or you have a chronic condition, such as diabetes.

 

Dental Decay — A Dynamic Infectious Disease Process

The mouth is an ecosystem — living organisms continually interact with every other element in their environment. The teeth are composed of an outer covering of enamel, a highly mineralized crystalline structure composed mainly of calcium and phosphate.

They are also bathed in a remarkable fluid — saliva, which plays a crucial role in maintaining a neutral environment or balance between the acids and bases in your mouth.

Acidity is measured by the pH scale, which ranges from 1 – 14. A pH value of 1 is extremely acidic while a pH value of 14 is extremely basic. The pH of the mouth is generally 7 — neutral.

 

What is endodontic treatment?

Root canal.

Endodontic treatment involves the root canal(s) inside of the tooth derived from “Endo” the Greek word for “inside” and “odont” is the Greek for “tooth.” To understand endodontic treatment, it helps to know something about the anatomy of the tooth.

The body of a tooth is made of dentin with the crown covered by enamel, one of the hardest substances produced in nature.

Inside the tooth, is a soft tissue called the pulp containing blood vessels, nerves and connective tissue, which creates the surrounding dentin and enamel during growth and development.

The pulp extends from the crown of the tooth to the tip of the roots where it connects to the tissues surrounding the root. Although the pulp is important during a tooth’s growth and development, once it is fully mature the tooth can survive without the pulp.

 

Chipped tooth.

Chipped or Fractured Teeth: Most chipped or fractured tooth crowns can be repaired either by reattaching the broken piece or by placing a tooth-coloured filling or restoration. If a significant portion of the tooth crown is broken off, an artificial crown or “cap” may be needed to restore the tooth.

 

How to protect oral health?

To protect your oral health, practice good oral hygiene daily.

  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day with a soft-bristled brush using fluoride toothpaste.
  • Floss daily.
  • Use mouthwash to remove food particles left after brushing and flossing.
  • Eat a healthy diet and limit food with added sugars.
  • Replace your toothbrush every three months or sooner if bristles are splayed or worn.
  • Schedule regular dental checkups and cleanings.
  • Avoid tobacco use.

Also, contact your dentist as soon as an oral health problem arises. Taking care of your oral health is an investment in your overall health.

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